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Stellareese-Cabernet Sauvignon-"Marcey

Stellareese
Cabernet Sauvignon
"Marcey's Vineyard" Calistoga, Napa Valley
2013

$42.00

Husband/wife winery making only this Cabernet from a tiny, organic vineyard in Calistoga. Sports ripe, slightly jammy black cherry smells and flavors along with cocoa, vanilla bean, a pinch of tarragon & sage and pomegranate syrup smells & flavors. Very rich, full-bodied and layered. Youthful tannins give structure while allowing the flavors to shine. 100% Cabernet Sauvignon. 400 cases made.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 


The Golden ratio (aka The Golden Mean)
is a special number found by dividing a line into two parts so that the longer part divided by the smaller part is also equal to the whole length divided by the longer part. It is often symbolized using phi, after the 21st letter of the Greek alphabet. In an equation form, it looks like this:

a/b = (a+b)/a = 1.6180339887498948420 …

As with pi (the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter), the digits go on and on, theoretically into infinity. Phi is usually rounded off to 1.618. This number has been discovered and rediscovered many times, which is why it has so many names — the Golden mean, the Golden section, divine proportion, etc. Historically, the number can be seen in the architecture of many ancient creations, like the Great Pyramids and the Parthenon. In the Great Pyramid of Giza, the length of each side of the base is 756 feet with a height of 481 feet. The ratio of the base to the height is roughly 1.5717, which is close to the Golden ratio.

In 1509, Luca Pacioli wrote a book that refers to the number as the "Divine Proportion," which was illustrated by Leonardo da Vinci. Da Vinci later called this sectio aurea or the Golden section. The Golden ratio was used to achieve balance and beauty in many Renaissance paintings and sculptures. Da Vinci himself used the Golden ratio to define all of the proportions in his Last Supper, including the dimensions of the table and the proportions of the walls and backgrounds. The Golden ratio also appears in da Vinci's Vitruvian Man and the Mona Lisa. Other artists who employed the Golden ratio include Michelangelo, Raphael, Rembrandt, Seurat, and Salvador Dali.

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